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"For the last 13 years I've worked covering issues primarily about women, poverty, health, and security. I didn’t realize it then, but all of these issues are really about nature. For quite some time, my work has focused on environmental issues. The irony being, very little of what I photograph is nature or landscape. Stories about the land are always stories about people. You cannot talk about one without the other. If recent storms and natural disasters tell us anything, it is that we are inextricably linked to the forces of nature. Climate change does impact us; no one is immune to it.

Two years ago, I made "A Climate Trap" - a film about climate change in Bangladesh. I’ve seen firsthand how women in developing countries bear the greatest burden as a result of these climatic shifts. For example, they must walk farther for water (some women walk up to 11 hours a day for poor quality water) or they must stay behind and care for their children when floods force the men to move and seek better resources. But you don’t have to go to Bangladesh to see the impact of climate change.

This is why I am thrilled to be working with the amazing group of people that compose Ripple Effect. Ripple Effect is a group of journalists dedicated to the mission of raising awareness and funding to help empower women and girls in emerging nations around the world. The organization works with NGOs, ambassadors and corporate leaders to document and support projects that help women support their families, communities, and the planet. Ripple Effect recognizes that programs which give women the tools to affect change are some of the most effective, because women reinvest those resources and share them with others."

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"Ami Vitale’s journey as a photographer and filmmaker has taken her to more than 85 countries where she has witnessed civil unrest and violence, as well as surreal beauty and the enduring power of the human spirit. Now based in Montana, Vitale is an Ambassador for Nikon and a contract photographer with National Geographic magazine.

Her photographs have been commissioned by a multitude of international publications and exhibited around the world in numerous museums, galleries and private collections. She has garnered prestigious awards including multiple prizes from World Press Photos, the Daniel Pearl Award for Outstanding Reporting, named Magazine Photographer of the Year by both the National Press Photographer’s Association and the International Photographer of the Year prize.

Recently, she has been the subject of the ten part television series for National Geographic Channel and another documentary series “Over the Islands of Africa”. She has been a featured speaker in more than 20 countries throughout Asia, Europe and Latin America. She is a founding member of Ripple Effect Images, a collective of reputable scientists, writers, photographers and filmmakers with a mission of creating powerful stories in order to illustrate issues women in developing countries face.”

 

Video on Ripple Effect Images: Media Storm: Ripple Effect Images

Recent Press: NYT Lens: The Real Story About the Wrong Photos is #BringBackOurGirls